Posts tagged ‘judgment’

Perspective

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I had a huge breakthrough today on the lesson of “Perspective.”  Years ago I received my Dharma Report.  It told me that I had spent many lifetimes exacting what I saw as “justice”.  Justice is my dharma, or life’s purpose.  However, it went on to say that it was now time to evolve this dharma through an understanding of the Law of Karma (of Cause and Effect).  I didn’t understand this report AT ALL when I first received it.  I was thoroughly disappointed, even.  I had a dharma that wasn’t even a good dharma?  I had to evolve it? What??  At the time I couldn’t even fathom it.  I’m to be an observer?  I’m to let people make mistakes?  I just. . .  watch them. . .  Isn’t that too passive?

But today I pieced things together.  On my morning walk I was contemplating this and other intuitive reports I’d received. I’d heard things like ” energetic constriction of the heart” and “a great love for her  ideas.”  A great attachment, it sounded like.  Suddenly, this morning it suddenly clicked: I have a very strong attachment to my perspective.   Perspective is often tied to judgment.  Judgement is what colors what is.  A situation has no meaning until we give it meaning.  We are the ones who label what’s “good” or “bad.”

Have you noticed that many people talk about their greatest challenges as some of the most influential parts of their lives?  They sure struggled, but they also came out a different person at the other end.  They learned things in a way that no book or class could ever teach them.  They were wiser, stronger.  Would it have been fair to rob them of those experiences?  Do you know the story of the child who cut open the cocoon of the struggling, new butterfly? In the end, the prematurely freed butterfly was not strong enough to fly.

And sometimes we’re just plain wrong.  I was blown away by how many times I was “wrong” on the Camino.  I sometimes misread the map (argued over it, too!), or misjudged a person’s actions, misunderstood a person’s words, or dismissed the effectiveness of certain treatments.

“What am I supposed to learn here?” I wondered afterward, “Is the lesson that I’m not to trust myself?”

It was actually teaching me to let go of my perspective.  It was teaching me openness, flexibility, and letting go.

So, what do we do then?  Trust the process.  Observe.   Listen and receive carefully and completely before we dismiss. Do the best we can.  Offer our perspective when asked or called to share.  Do what we can with what he have.  Experiment, learn, grow.  And then, release.  Let it go, let life flow.

Love, light, and many blessings. ❤

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A Couple’s Dharmas

ID-100259109Dr. Barbara asked me to write up what I’d shared during the conclusion of the Dharma Spiritual Focus Session I attended with Brian two weeks ago.  She’s thinking about using part of it in one of her future books, and I am excited to offer you a preview. . .

A few weeks ago Brian and I both got our dharma reports. This was an incredible blessing for me. I’d been waiting a year to receive my report, and even more than this, I was thrilled that Brian had agreed to visit the college to get his. Whatever happened, I was just glad that he had come, that he would get to see what I see and experience what I experience when I go on a weekend. From now on, when I talk to him about my weekends, he’ll have a better picture.

I was even more amazed and grateful when I actually heard Brian’s report. Tears flowed down my face from the moment Dr. Barbara started reporting. It’s a beautiful report and a beautiful dharma. But not only that, it fits perfectly with mine.

My report says that I need to evolve my dharma. My dharma is described as “justice”, and in my past lives, I’ve been a champion for others, defending the accused and rescuing others from tyranny. I carried into this lifetime a desire to “right wrongs” and “fix” things. My report says that I need to focus on understanding kharma this lifetime. I’m good at identifying effects, but I need to stop judging them, stop looking for what’s “wrong.”. Instead, I need to respect and allow the law of cause and effect, observe and understand the ebb and flow of the results of the choices that are made.  From there I am to envision what choices can be made, what can be created, so that I can create productive changes in my life and help others do the same.

What I need is a change of perspective . . .

And that’s Brian’s dharma: “evolving into perspective.” It is activated through the triad of sustainability, attentiveness, and a sense of humor. Brian’s dharma is also about change and helping others grow:

“The ability for change to occur lies in this one’s Dharma. The ability to see things differently, to have a sense of respect, a sense of dignity personally in terms of the individual, and then to develop this into a perceptiveness in the thinking that allows for different outcomes, different possibilities, for different choices then to be made that can cause improvement, growth, sustainability, humor, and the attentiveness necessary for something to come about.” (9-12-15-BGC-DRC-10)

I have now listened to our reports many times and continue to understand them on a deeper level. At first I recognized how his expanded perceptiveness was a key to the evolution of my judgementalism. Then I was struck by how his “sustainability” and expanded “perceptiveness” had been pivotal in the survival of our own relationship. Finally, I recognized that both of our dharmas are in a state of flux and share a common ideal. Together we can be instruments of awareness, understanding, and growth for the world.

Love, light, and many blessings to you all!

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Metaphysical Monday: Frustrations = Misunderstandings

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Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net”

I’ve noticed a change in myself.  I’m becoming more aware of my judgements and more aware of my frustrations with situations and people’s reactions that don’t go as I imagine they will (or should).

At first I thought these reactions meant I was coming more into my own, that I was becoming more self-empowered.  But today I reflected on it further.  I believe it does have to do with self-empowerment; However, it means  I am on the road to self-empowerment.  I am not becoming more self-empowered by being more stubborn and opinionated.  Yes, I am beginning to take more notice of myself and what I believe.  I am developing more confidence, strength.  But the frustration itself stems from misunderstanding — we learn in metaphysics class that anger comes from misunderstanding.  So, then, what do I need to understand?

I need to understand self-empowerment!    True self-empowerment.  I cannot change my environment.  I cannot change other people.  I cannot change situations.  But I can change myself.   I can change how I view a situation; I can change how I react to a situation.   And I can become centered within myself; as the world around me spins like crazy, I can maintain my core.  I can know I AM, know my Creator, and know light and love.

And when I know these, truly, truly know all of this — all frustrations will melt away, opinions will be irrelevant, and I will live in eternal joy.

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