Posts tagged ‘dharma’

Perspective

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I had a huge breakthrough today on the lesson of “Perspective.”  Years ago I received my Dharma Report.  It told me that I had spent many lifetimes exacting what I saw as “justice”.  Justice is my dharma, or life’s purpose.  However, it went on to say that it was now time to evolve this dharma through an understanding of the Law of Karma (of Cause and Effect).  I didn’t understand this report AT ALL when I first received it.  I was thoroughly disappointed, even.  I had a dharma that wasn’t even a good dharma?  I had to evolve it? What??  At the time I couldn’t even fathom it.  I’m to be an observer?  I’m to let people make mistakes?  I just. . .  watch them. . .  Isn’t that too passive?

But today I pieced things together.  On my morning walk I was contemplating this and other intuitive reports I’d received. I’d heard things like ” energetic constriction of the heart” and “a great love for her  ideas.”  A great attachment, it sounded like.  Suddenly, this morning it suddenly clicked: I have a very strong attachment to my perspective.   Perspective is often tied to judgment.  Judgement is what colors what is.  A situation has no meaning until we give it meaning.  We are the ones who label what’s “good” or “bad.”

Have you noticed that many people talk about their greatest challenges as some of the most influential parts of their lives?  They sure struggled, but they also came out a different person at the other end.  They learned things in a way that no book or class could ever teach them.  They were wiser, stronger.  Would it have been fair to rob them of those experiences?  Do you know the story of the child who cut open the cocoon of the struggling, new butterfly? In the end, the prematurely freed butterfly was not strong enough to fly.

And sometimes we’re just plain wrong.  I was blown away by how many times I was “wrong” on the Camino.  I sometimes misread the map (argued over it, too!), or misjudged a person’s actions, misunderstood a person’s words, or dismissed the effectiveness of certain treatments.

“What am I supposed to learn here?” I wondered afterward, “Is the lesson that I’m not to trust myself?”

It was actually teaching me to let go of my perspective.  It was teaching me openness, flexibility, and letting go.

So, what do we do then?  Trust the process.  Observe.   Listen and receive carefully and completely before we dismiss. Do the best we can.  Offer our perspective when asked or called to share.  Do what we can with what he have.  Experiment, learn, grow.  And then, release.  Let it go, let life flow.

Love, light, and many blessings. ❤

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Still Weekend

www.som.org

I just came back from the Still Mind Weekend in Windyville, Missouri.  It was fantastic.  I didn’t want to come back. . . mostly because I didn’t want to deal with the odds and ends that were waiting for me back at home.  But I realized 2 things with that thought: 1. I need to honor my entire existence, including the physical (Can’t avoid it!).  2. All this stuff is really not a big deal in the whole picture of existence, anyway (so no point in freaking out about it).

I got my 4th intuitive report in the last 5 months.  I really did not intend to get that many reports this year (and at once!).  I just wanted the Creative Mind report and the Dharma report this year.  Buuuut I jumped on the Meditation report when it moved weekends — I’d really been wanting that one.  And I really wanted to get another Health Analysis report in solidarity with my metaphysics students who were getting theirs. (Great decision.)  I’m glad it worked out this way because all 4 have been connected and have helped me understand myself better and my purpose this lifetime.

So, in a nutshell, I need to be with people, and I need to help people.  This idea was cemented for me when I listened to all 11 of my intuitive reports back-to-back on the ride back from WindyvilleMy first past life profile from my earlier lessons says: “This one needs to aid others in the way that this one has been aided.” And all 4 of my recent intuitive reports mention people.  My Creative Mind report says that I open my creative mind when I emulate others.  My Dharma report says that I need to understand, respect, and appreciate others’ kharma — what they are working on in this lifetime.  My health analysis says that I need to share my imaginative visions with others while having a healthy respect for others’ thoughts, ideas, and gifts.  And my Meditation report says that I need to better understand influence — how it affects me and others — and to use it in leadership and for understanding, for the good of all concerned.

It is then no wonder that I get out of my mental slumps when I get out of the house and am around people.  It is no wonder that I LOVE teaching metaphysics and enjoy helping my tutoring students.  When I get wrapped up in my own thoughts I am in ego and conscious mind.  When I am with others I reconnect with subconscious and superconscious mind.   I suspect that the plan tucked away in my superconscious mind is basically about serving others to the benefit of humanity.  My last report says I’ve already been putting things in place for the work I’m to do.  I am in a service field: tutoring and teaching.  I have expanded my volunteer work in the School of Metaphysics (teaching, lecturing, attending events, becoming the director-in-training).  And I intend to serve through media, too, by continuing to blog and to start writing inspirational children’s stories.

A lot of what we talk about in the school comes down to purpose.  Why are we doing what we’re doing?  My answer: serving others for the good of all concerned.

Sending you all love, joy, and renewed insight into your purpose for this lifetime! ❤

Image of the World Headquarters in Windyville, Missouri (www.som.org), location of the Still Mind Weekend.

On Perspective, Finding the Gold, and “Ms. Self-Righteous” and “Disgust”

Perspective and “Ms. Self-Righteous”

My dharma has been coming up quite a bit in the last week (or at least I’m more aware of it now).  The old dharma, that is.  My dharma report says I need to evolve my dharma.  I notice my dharma these days when I get all riled up over something that I disagree with or that I want to control.  Yesterday it came up with Brian.  That’s when I became aware of another aspect of myself: “Ms. Self-Righteous.”  I think she’s twin sisters with “Ms. Manipulator.”  When I want to control something, they team up.

Basically, what I’m talking about is when I get a particular perspective and the blinders go on.  This one thing is right, and this other thing is wrong, and I want the other person to see this or fix this — or in general, I just want to control this.

Last weekend on the car ride back from our National Teacher’s Weekend I found myself in a situation that I hadn’t expected, and I had a pretty confident opinion about how I thought things should go.  I presented a compromise,  but I secretly hoped that the others involved would see the light and go along with my original plan.  Nope.  They took the compromise with no problem.  This was a shock to me because sometimes the manipulation worked with Brian.

So, when I spoke with Brian yesterday and he called me out on my self-righteous tone, I was shocked into awareness and began to reflect on last week and some of my other experiences.  I realized that I have an attachment to my way of thinking, my way of seeing things, and I feel frustrated and helpless when I can’t get my way.  This is not what I want.

New plan: go with the flow. Allow for different perspectives.  Expand the possibilities.  Invite experiences.  Also, I would like to see learning as more of a game, as an exploration.  I would like to experiment with life with clear intentions and observe how things unfold.  And then at the end of the day, gather all the clay, rework it, and see what enfolds.

Finding the Gold

We’ve got to take the “good” that we can out of every learning experience.  One of my classmates commented on a presentation he’d heard and how one thing the presenter said in the beginning caused him to shut down and not pay any attention to the rest of the presentation.  I was amused by this because I had listened to the exact same presentation and had felt it had blown my mind and expanded my awareness in at least 5 different ways!  Our metaphysics teacher explained that we need to “find the gold” in any experience, in any person — in anything!  If we want to find something valuable — we will!  If we expect to find something awful, we will.  (And we’ll miss out on the good stuff!)  Our teacher then began to talk about famous “good” people and how even they were not perfect.  (But they still did some pretty awesome things!)  Look for the gold; look for the good.  Every moment has treasure and meaning.  We can be grateful for this.  All we need are open eyes and an open heart.

This morning I found myself judging a situation again.  I was suddenly aware of the processes of my mind and how I was quickly concluding with “disgust” (another aspect of myself) and a certainty in my opinion.  I then paused and recognized something greater than my opinion — a desire to connect with someone and be a support for him in a situation that could be for his highest good.  And I recognized a few ways I modify the situation for myself to make it moderately pleasant for me.

We cannot change anyone.  We can only change ourselves.  Sometimes we can’t change a situation, but we can change how we look at it.  We can find the gold. . .  and then let it go.

Many blessings of love and joy to all of you. ❤

A Couple’s Dharmas

ID-100259109Dr. Barbara asked me to write up what I’d shared during the conclusion of the Dharma Spiritual Focus Session I attended with Brian two weeks ago.  She’s thinking about using part of it in one of her future books, and I am excited to offer you a preview. . .

A few weeks ago Brian and I both got our dharma reports. This was an incredible blessing for me. I’d been waiting a year to receive my report, and even more than this, I was thrilled that Brian had agreed to visit the college to get his. Whatever happened, I was just glad that he had come, that he would get to see what I see and experience what I experience when I go on a weekend. From now on, when I talk to him about my weekends, he’ll have a better picture.

I was even more amazed and grateful when I actually heard Brian’s report. Tears flowed down my face from the moment Dr. Barbara started reporting. It’s a beautiful report and a beautiful dharma. But not only that, it fits perfectly with mine.

My report says that I need to evolve my dharma. My dharma is described as “justice”, and in my past lives, I’ve been a champion for others, defending the accused and rescuing others from tyranny. I carried into this lifetime a desire to “right wrongs” and “fix” things. My report says that I need to focus on understanding kharma this lifetime. I’m good at identifying effects, but I need to stop judging them, stop looking for what’s “wrong.”. Instead, I need to respect and allow the law of cause and effect, observe and understand the ebb and flow of the results of the choices that are made.  From there I am to envision what choices can be made, what can be created, so that I can create productive changes in my life and help others do the same.

What I need is a change of perspective . . .

And that’s Brian’s dharma: “evolving into perspective.” It is activated through the triad of sustainability, attentiveness, and a sense of humor. Brian’s dharma is also about change and helping others grow:

“The ability for change to occur lies in this one’s Dharma. The ability to see things differently, to have a sense of respect, a sense of dignity personally in terms of the individual, and then to develop this into a perceptiveness in the thinking that allows for different outcomes, different possibilities, for different choices then to be made that can cause improvement, growth, sustainability, humor, and the attentiveness necessary for something to come about.” (9-12-15-BGC-DRC-10)

I have now listened to our reports many times and continue to understand them on a deeper level. At first I recognized how his expanded perceptiveness was a key to the evolution of my judgementalism. Then I was struck by how his “sustainability” and expanded “perceptiveness” had been pivotal in the survival of our own relationship. Finally, I recognized that both of our dharmas are in a state of flux and share a common ideal. Together we can be instruments of awareness, understanding, and growth for the world.

Love, light, and many blessings to you all!

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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