Posts tagged ‘Camino’

A Journey of 1,000 miles (or 750). . . The Kumano Kodo

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I’ve been wandering a bit, looking for a direction for this blog.  I think I’ve found it.  I’m a Lightworker and Adventurer, and here is my journey.  I hope you may find some benefit for you.

Adventuring: The Kumano Kodo (Japan)

Last Fall I was inspired by the documentary: Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago to walk the Camino de Santiago, 500 miles through northern Spain.  I got a few minor and major kicks from the universe to get going on that journey, sooner rather than later, so in spring of 2017 I set the date and gave myself 2 months to prepare. I left for St. Jean Pied de Porte, France on July 26th and embarked on my 31-day journey.

When you are working on a dream, you must have one ready in the wings, and I received my next inspiration while still walking the Camino.  Some travelers spoke of another long walk — the Kumano Kodo — in Japan, also ancient, also spiritual, and 750 miles.   I was hooked.  Some weeks after completing the Camino in Spain, I declared my intention to walk the Kumano Kodo.  I set the date for the summer of 2019.

While driving to a Mastermind Retreat this past Friday I reflected on my goals and fixed on the Kumano Kodo.  I thought about the Camino and the manifestation process I’d experienced.  Yes, I had gone, I had made it until the end, and it had been a fantastic trip — and yet it set me back a bit in my finances.  And the Camino is a fairly economical walk.  From the research I’d done so far on the Kumano Kodo, the expenses would be higher this time, and this time I would not be walking solo — my fiancee was determined to join me on this trip.

So, I decided it’s time to push myself to the next level on this one.  New goal: going sponsored on the Kumano Kodo, including: travel to-and-from Japan for me and my fiancee, food and accommodations, updated hiking equipment, possible pet care expenses back at home, expenses for documentation of the journey, and work stipends.

My next thought is that I might approach Japan.  I read an article that the Japanese reached out to Spain to learn more about the Camino, wanting Japan’s Kumano Kodo to experience the same popularity.  I could help market for them by documenting my journey!

My next thoughts were:

  1. I know 2 people from Japan.
  2. I’m reading Tools of the Titans by Tim Ferriss, and I just got to the section entitled:  “Hacking Kickstarter.”  I could copy those pages and start from there.

And that’s as far as I’ve gotten so far. . .  If you have any other ideas, please share the love! But before I go, I also have some news in the Lightworker arena.

Lightworking: A Little “Healing Touch”

I was inspired over the past few weeks to pick up my Healing Touch manual again.  I was certified in Level 1 Healing Touch a few years ago.  A therapist at work just received Level 3 certification in Healing Touch, and I received a wonderful healing from her.  And just this past week I received a sound healing/Reiki/massage that was also just what I’d needed.

I’ve been certified in Level 1 Reiki and Level 1 Healing Touch, and I’ve attended the Hands of Light weekend workshop.  I’ve also been told in multiple intuitive reports that I have the “healing touch”, and that it would be beneficial to use it.  It finally feels like it’s time.

Saturday I practiced the Self-Chakra Clearing and felt a difference.  I then practiced the Chakra healing on two family members who also felt a difference.  (My goal is to do the clearing on myself every day and to do it for others at least once a week and possibly my pets.)  I’ve also been reading The Healing Energy of Your Hands by Michael Bradford and am really enjoying it (half-way done).

Conclusion

I feel I have more direction now.  I am a lightworker and adventurer: manifesting adventures, spreading the word of self as creator, and embracing my abilities as a healer.  I thank the Great Spirit, angels and all entities of light for their continued guidance, love, and protection. And thank you for another day.

Much love and many blessings. ❤

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Top Two Lessons from the Camino

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I’m back! Writing again!  It’s Teri, Joyedian (entertainer, healer, teacher).  As you know, I just walked 500 miles in 31 days though northern Spain on the Camino de Santiago.  It was an amazing experience, and I’m definitely doing it again!

I’d like to share with you the two most important things I learned:

1) Everyone has his/her own “Camino.”  Some prefer to walk alone; some go in groups.  Some preferred to stay in albergues (hostels), while others stayed in hotels.  Some got blisters, some had none.  Some carried small backpacks, and some carried the world on their backs!  It is the same in life.  Every person’s journey is unique.  We come into this world with gifts to give and lessons to learn.  We come to shine our light for the world.

2) My life’s mission became clearer.  I inspire individuals to change themselves so that they can change the world!

What is your “Camino” (Journey)?  Would you like to share part of this wild ride called life with me? 

I’m starting up the monthly “Your Joyful Life” newsletter again.

It includes inspirational, motivational content, including:

  • my favorite blog post of the month
  • my favorite video of the month
  • workshops and classes coming up
  • the Special! of the month
  • your monthly FREE gift  (September’s is the transcript from my Toastmasters speech “10 Things I Never Expected to Never Forget on the Camino”)

Are you in? Here’s what I need from you:

1)  Click here for terikarl.com to my access my contact form and tell me  “Yes, thank you!” or “Yes” or “I’m in!”  etc,  if you’d like to receive “It’s a Joyful Life”

OR

2) Do nothing and just keep enjoying “A Moment in Life.”

Much love and many blessings. I look forward to hearing from you.

Love,

Teri

Perspective

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I had a huge breakthrough today on the lesson of “Perspective.”  Years ago I received my Dharma Report.  It told me that I had spent many lifetimes exacting what I saw as “justice”.  Justice is my dharma, or life’s purpose.  However, it went on to say that it was now time to evolve this dharma through an understanding of the Law of Karma (of Cause and Effect).  I didn’t understand this report AT ALL when I first received it.  I was thoroughly disappointed, even.  I had a dharma that wasn’t even a good dharma?  I had to evolve it? What??  At the time I couldn’t even fathom it.  I’m to be an observer?  I’m to let people make mistakes?  I just. . .  watch them. . .  Isn’t that too passive?

But today I pieced things together.  On my morning walk I was contemplating this and other intuitive reports I’d received. I’d heard things like ” energetic constriction of the heart” and “a great love for her  ideas.”  A great attachment, it sounded like.  Suddenly, this morning it suddenly clicked: I have a very strong attachment to my perspective.   Perspective is often tied to judgment.  Judgement is what colors what is.  A situation has no meaning until we give it meaning.  We are the ones who label what’s “good” or “bad.”

Have you noticed that many people talk about their greatest challenges as some of the most influential parts of their lives?  They sure struggled, but they also came out a different person at the other end.  They learned things in a way that no book or class could ever teach them.  They were wiser, stronger.  Would it have been fair to rob them of those experiences?  Do you know the story of the child who cut open the cocoon of the struggling, new butterfly? In the end, the prematurely freed butterfly was not strong enough to fly.

And sometimes we’re just plain wrong.  I was blown away by how many times I was “wrong” on the Camino.  I sometimes misread the map (argued over it, too!), or misjudged a person’s actions, misunderstood a person’s words, or dismissed the effectiveness of certain treatments.

“What am I supposed to learn here?” I wondered afterward, “Is the lesson that I’m not to trust myself?”

It was actually teaching me to let go of my perspective.  It was teaching me openness, flexibility, and letting go.

So, what do we do then?  Trust the process.  Observe.   Listen and receive carefully and completely before we dismiss. Do the best we can.  Offer our perspective when asked or called to share.  Do what we can with what he have.  Experiment, learn, grow.  And then, release.  Let it go, let life flow.

Love, light, and many blessings. ❤

Camino Thoughts: Living vs. Processing

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I’ve realized over the last few days that the Camino was meant to be lived.  Now is the time for processing.  There were times while walking on the Camino when I thought: “Ah yes, I’m alone now.  So, it must be time to think.”  But I found myself resistant to that notion. I pictured myself at a laptop, as I am now, or writing at my desk in my journal.  I was pretty resistant to purposely “thinking.”

So, I yielded.  I focused on the way.  I focused on continuing to take footsteps.  On uphills, I sang.  On downhills I watched my footing.  But, often, I flew down, allowing gravity to run down the path with me. Sometimes I distracted myself with random thoughts, so I wouldn’t think about how tired or sore or how hungry I was, or how much I was wishing I was already at the next albergue (hostel).  Other times I noticed the trees, the sky, the mountains, the fields and rivers, the flowers, the birds and butterflies, the people ahead of and behind me.  At times as I walked, I looked in my guidebook at was coming up or munched on a snack from one of my side pockets.  I debated whether to make this next town a bathroom and snack stop — or if I could continue on through.

That was my Camino.  I was in it.  It was me, and my backpack, and the open road.  It was enough.  And it was wonderful.  ❤

Blessings, love, and light. ❤

Camino Gratitude

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As you may have heard me say before: I intended to walk the Camino alone.  I did this, but not really.  And I am grateful for everyone who took the walk with me emotionally, spiritually, and physically.  I would like to acknowledge them here.

My Inspiration

First, I would like to thank Goldie Matthew.  I first learned of the Camino at her Motivational Movie Night, when I saw Walking the Camino: 6 Ways to Santiago for the first time. (The seed was planted!)

Father Don Elias

I also want to thank the priest, Father Don Elias, who revived the Camino and whose yellow arrows guided me so perfectly all the way to Santiago.

My Family

I am also grateful for my family, who supported me immediately from vision through completion to readjusting to normal life!  My fiancee made sure I checked in every day and gave me a perfect welcome home. My dad was immediately excited for me and offered me some travel gear to help me on my journey.  My sister helped take care of our pets while I was gone, supported me financially in some of my travel costs, and helped me download Relaxercise, which saved my feet from tendonitis and any other possible foot ills!  My mom bought me the two guide books that helped me set the perfect foundation for a successful trip, as well as my amazing hiking boots, sleeping gear, and other odds and ends.  It was truly a group effort!

My Grandmothers

Next I would like to thank my grandmothers!  My Ukrainian grandmother prayed the “Little Flower Novena” for me every day, followed my travels on a map from town to town, and told me to watch for roses (which I saw EVERY day!)  My grandmother-in-law encouraged me with her Facebook comments on my trip updates.  My Illinois grandmother sent me off with the most beautiful, loving phone message that touched me and made me cry.

The Pilgrims

I am so grateful for the many people I met along the way, some who I met in passing — some who I’m still connected to!  I met people from Mexico, Argentina, Puerto Rico, many parts of the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Ireland, England, Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Tunisia, South Korea, China, Norway, Sweden, Slovenia, Poland, Lithuania, Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand! (And I’m probably missing some!)

Though I needed my solitude, it would have been incredibly challenging for me to have walked the whole way alone.  I am grateful to those who shared dinner with me, albergues with me, part of the Way with me, or even just a “Buen Camino!” with me!

My Home Community

The outpouring of support I received from the community back home was unbelievable, and I was amazed by how powerful and pivotal that encouragement was for me. Some supported me through texts, some through social media.  I posted updates on Facebook maybe 15 times, and the amount of loving, supportive comments I received was staggering.  I am truly grateful to anyone who was a part of this journey, on any level.

My Spiritual Community

I would be remiss if I did not give thanks to those in the spiritual realm who were with me every step of the way.  Of course, I give thanks to Source, the Creator of all (including me, Spain, and the Camino!)  I thank the angels and spirit guides who keep me safe, nudge me with guidance and teachings, and who support and unconditionally love me through every little detail.  (May I learn to love as you do!)

I give thanks again to everyone mentioned here, to anyone I may have missed, and to you readers, who have also been a part of my journey.  Your love and support means more to me than you could ever know.

Love, light, and blessings. ❤

Reintegration

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Still walking a mini-“Camino” back home!  Do you like my mini backpack?  (So much lighter!)

I’ve been giving myself time to “process” the Camino.  But now I’m pretty convinced I’m just procrastinating — and people have been asking about it — so it’s time to get writing again.

I’ve been reintegrating myself into “normal life,” but it’s been a little weird because most of my tutoring clients want to wait to start up again until after I return from next week’s Shaklee conference.  And as far as coaching, I haven’t started the ball back rolling yet.  I’m still looking at where I want to tweak things, as I continue to reinvent myself.

So, really, this week, I’ve mostly put “life” (work) on hold and have turned to my house and other parts of my life.  My sister has been a wonderful support this week.  I’ve continued to do my daily “Camino”, now with my sister for an hour or two in the mornings, which has been wonderful for mental processing.  We’ve also been reorganizing the whole house, a project she started with my fiancee, even before I’d returned!  The kitchen is now the most organized it’s ever been, the living room looks fantastic, and the office is becoming more inviting.  We moved a set of the bookshelves into the basement, and I replaced them with a wall of plants!

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It’s a jungle in here!

Another blessing in this transition has been the connections I made through the Camino.  I decided I was going to “bare bones” it with technology and get a very minimalistic plan and rely on wifi.  (This was supposed to be a spiritual experience, right??)  This became a little tricky when I began to make friends and wanted to stay connected with people along the route who who had better internet access.

 

Camino friend: “Do you have “WhatsApp”?

Me: No.

Camino Friend:Well, you can download it from the App store.”

Me: Yeah, but I have no internet access anyway until I get to the next albergue with wifi. . .

So, FINALLY, on the last day of my trip I download the app, and have therefore been able to stay connected with one of the groups of friends I made along the way, vicariously walking on to Finisterre with them and also bonding over post-Camino transitions and issues.

Me: Weird random question: Did anyone else’s feet balloon up big time after you stopped walking?  I think mine are finally returning to normal . . .

Camino Friend 1: Yes, (Camino Friend 2) is having that happen now, lol

Camino Friend 3: It happened to me yesterday! A little today.

Camino Friend 2: I’m surprised it happened to me but yes, it helps to prop your feet up.  Usually it gets bad when I’ve been sitting for longer than an hour.

Me: Glad to know I’m not completely abnormal!  I’ll have to do that more.

Camino Friend 3: I went shoe shopping in Porto yesterday.  Was kind of embarrassing!

Camino Friend 4: The same Way happened to me as you, as we. . .  in fact.

Camino Friend 5: YES.  The 11 hr flight also didn’t help.  Everything was swelling and getting super stiff.

I’ve also kept contact with my  young French friend through Facebook messenger and also reconnected with a friend that I met my very first night!  I joined the Facebook group American Pilgrims on the Camino (APOC) ® before I left for the Camino, to get advice for the trip.   I was stunned this week to see a posted picture of an American pilgrim standing alongside my Beilari Scottish dinner mate and rose-tatooed Canadian friend! She wrote this beautiful message:

Camino good byes are so difficult! I’ve spent the past 36 days with Craig and Virginia. We met on June 28, our first day, each of us setting out on our own. I met Craig on the way up the mountain, while trying to catch my breath. Virginia and I met up shortly after, taking a small break. Who knew that that first day would set the tone for my Camino. It’s strange for pilgrims to walk together for so long, but we just clicked. These two made my Camino incredible. We’ve shared a unique experience that’s impossible for others to understand. They’re my family now. They will forever be a part of my life and forever be in my heart. I can’t thank them enough for everything. The Camino works in amazing ways. They came into my life when I needed it the most.

In the past when I’ve gone on trips, we’ve tended to quickly lose connection as the memories of the trip fade into the background, and our lives come back to the foreground.  Here’s to hoping this time will be different — especially since I plan to continue on other “Camino”s!

Sharing this with you has been wonderful.  I plan to schedule a post for every day this week, even while I’m away at conference.  (Keep an eye out!)

Love, light, and blessings. ❤

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